Nursing Team Recognized 
 
 
Claire Grantham, Georgette Sabota, Karen Kelly,
Rose Racho, Christie Gonder & Kirsten Featherstone.

A team of nurses at Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center have been recognized for its multi-disciplinary approach to significantly reduce the use of foley catheters at the hospital by ADVANCE for Nurses magazine, a national nursing trade publication. ADVANCE for Nurses honored Sierra Vista with runner-up recognition in the 2009 Best Nursing Team contest in its April 27 edition.

Sierra Vista was one of only five nursing teams recognized by ADVANCE for Nurses in California. The ADVANCE for Nurses’ judging panel had representation from nurses throughout the country.

“What stood out to our judges was the sense of inclusion that was fostered by the Sierra Vista team,” said Luke Cowles, ADVANCE for Nurses regional editor, who presented the award. “By including community physicians, nurses, hospitalists, the hospital’s Quality Department and others, everyone had a voice in the process empowering them each to be an agent of change.”

The nurses recognized included Christie Gonder, Chief Nursing Officer; Claire Grantham, Infection Prevention Nurse; Kirsten Featherstone, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Karen Kelly, Director of Critical Care Services; Remonia Ashmore, Director of the Medical Surgical Unit; Rose Racho, Nurse Educator; and, Georgette Sabota, Director of Emergency Services.

At the end of 2006 it was noted there was a reasonably high rate of foley catheter utilization at Sierra Vista which could have been contributing to urinary tract infections. By identifying the reasons for this, the nursing team set about to develop a set of solutions involving physicians, nursing staff and support personnel. By standardizing procedures, developing a policy and implementing protocols, foley catheter use at Sierra Vista has been reduced 11%.

“The Sierra Vista Foley Catheter Team was cited for demonstrating adaptability and teamwork to develop and implement a system that has proven to significantly reduce urinary catheter use at the hospital,” Gonder said. “By doing so the nurses took a team approach to identify and address a solution to patients developing urinary tract infections.”